Dernier & Hamlyn illuminates London's The Wellesley

Dernier & Hamlyn produced a lighting collection manufactured to Fox Linton designs for The Wellesley, the new townhouse hotel in Knightsbridge, London. The building has been restored with a combination of its 1920s history and contemporary style. With 36 rooms and suites, it also boasts a Cigar Lounge and Terrace, The Crystal Bar, The Oval Restaurant and a Jazz Room.

The fittings produced by Dernier & Hamlyn can be seen throughout the hotel’s public areas. These include a large circular chandelier dressed with blue glass along with wall lights fitted with LED’s made to replicate cigars for the Humidor Lounge, a two-meter square chandelier for the Crystal Bar that is fitted with tiers of hundreds of faceted crystal beads, six crystal chandeliers for the Colonnade Lobby, a 1,500-millimeter diameter chandelier in the Oval Restaurant fitted with rods and solid glass balls and a large circular chandelier dressed with clear glass for the Jazz Lounge.

Dernier & Hamlyn also manufactured almost 150 table lamps and floor standards that are in the bedrooms and public and for the portico, ceiling and wall lights in an octagonal art deco style with antique bronze finish metal frames and opaque white glass shades. Externally large external bronze lanterns that feature on the front wall and a lantern fixed to a solid iron hand cast frame almost 8.2 feet wide weighing in at some 440 pounds that graces the front of the hotel were also produced.

Dernier & Hamlyn’s sister companies Louis Montrose and Tindle Lighting were also involved in this project. Louis Montrose was responsible for production of a bespoke screen decorated with crystal that can be seen in The Wellesley’s Jazz room, while Tindle supplied picture lights installed throughout the corridors of the building.

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