Four Points Makassar to debut in Indonesia

Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide announced that its Four Points by Sheraton brand will debut in Indonesia. Developed by IMB Group, Four Points by Sheraton Makassar is scheduled to open in May 2015. The property will mark Starwood's entry onto the island of Sulawesi.

Four Points has more than 180 hotels open in more than 30 countries worldwide, and has the second largest pipeline among all Starwood brands.

Four Points Makassar is located at Jalan Landak Baru, in the heart of Makassar's developing new business district. The hotel will have two towers with a total of 261 guestrooms. Upon completion, the hotel is expected to have the largest convention center in Makassar with its two ballrooms and 16 meeting rooms, totaling a meeting space area of approximately 69,965 square feet.

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Additionally, the hotel facilities will include a swimming pool, full-service dining, a fitness center and a variety of other amenities such as free Wi-Fi connectivity, free bottled water and free coffee.

Starwood currently operates 14 properties in Indonesia under six of the company's nine distinct lifestyle brands including: St. Regis, W, The Luxury Collection, Sheraton, Westin and Le Meridien. The company will expand its portfolio in the country with 10 properties in the pipeline including the opening of The Westin Ubud Resort & Spa on the island of Bali this year.

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