Manipulating mood and space by crafty design

Cabot Wrenn
Chairs with arms can help narrow guest focus to people or objects located directly across from them. Pictured above is the Marriott Irvine, Calif.

With purposeful design, visual tricks in seating arrangement can be used to control the perception of space in a room by making it feel more open or isolated based on the hotel’s intent. Sometimes, the difference between a rowdy and reserved lobby space is in the shape of your seating.

Jennifer McCord of Partners by Design, a designer for Cabot Wrenn and Council, suggests using higher-backed chairs to create the feeling of a secluded area for guests to settle in. “Seating with taller backs or shelters provide the perception of quiet nooks for people to retreat into without actually leaving the public space,” McCord said.

Seats with tall backs that also have arms can help close the space around guests, making them feel secluded during conversations and increase intimacy in the setting.

“The lobby is now 100 percent a place to show off, and can cater to a fun, younger crowd,” said Vlad Spivak, CEO of Modern Line Furniture. “In an upscale hotel environment, you want the room to have a look that positively influences guest moods with a feeling of experiencing luxury.”

“We can lighten up the mood of a room with an architecturally rich chair,” said John Menas, SVP of sales at MTS Seating. “Choosing the correct color, temperature and texture alongside a product’s architecture can change the feel of a space. Softer edges or the use of different finishes can also set the mood of a given area.”

“It’s important that your statement be immediate. If you present to them something attractive they will gravitate to it.” - Vlad Spivak, CEO, Modern Line Furniture.

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