Patrick O'Connell, Joyce Conwy Evans collaborate to restore Inn at Little Washington in Washington

The Inn at Little Washington opened the most recent addition to its campus, bringing the total number of buildings to 16, and the number of guestrooms to 24.

The Parsonage, so named because of its proximity to Trinity Episcopal Church, is located on Main Street directly across from The Inn's legendary restaurant in the heart of "Little" Washington. The 6,000-square-foot 1850s Victorian house was restored and now has six new guestrooms with fireplaces and bay windows overlooking the village.

Collaborating with London designer Joyce Conwy Evans, chef and proprietor Patrick O'Connell created the ambiance of a countryside house. The Parsonage's reflect a more modern interpretation of The Inn at Little Washington's English Country House aesthetic.

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A former side porch is now a Moorish inspired glass-enclosed conservatory which serves as the main entrance to the Parsonage. The ceiling of this foyer was tented in a green-striped fabric and the floor is an intricately patterned Tunisian tile. There is an antique French lantern hanging in the center of the tent.

A T-shaped center hall draws an arriving guest through the house and out through symmetrical French doors onto a porch. The hallways are papered in a William Morris tulip pattern. The public spaces feel as if they were the original sitting rooms to the 1850s house. Bay windows with window seats flood the house with sunlight. From the second floor, one looks out on the textured roof tops and stone chimneys of the little village with the mountains in the distance. The side porch faces an old enclosed garden with giant oaks, a smokehouse and a summer kitchen.

Each guestroom is individually decorated in a light-filled style employing a palette of pastel colors, English fabrics and wall papers. Bathrooms include Waterworks tile and fixtures, grey Carrera marble vanities and Bulgari amenities. A junior suite offers a soaking tub overlooking the garden.

The exterior of the house is now a sage green with all the architectural details highlighted by two shades of cream. Rust colored shutters and a copper roof provide accents.

The Town of Washington and Trinity Episcopal Church cooperated in allowing The Inn to transform the car park in the center of town into a town square by adding stone walls, planters and trees, and landscaping. Around the square, The Inn installed period, handmade, copper lanterns and lamp posts based on an original design found in Richmond, Virginia.

Nestled at the foot of the Blue Ridge Mountains, The Inn at Little Washington been a culinary destination since 1978. Located in the tiny hamlet of Washington, Virginia, The Inn is a restorative retreat 67 miles west of Washington. The 26-acre campus includes formal gardens, green houses and vegetable gardens which grow most of The Inn's produce in season. The Inn's grounds are also home to a flock of sheep, two llamas and a brood of chickens. The Inn is a member of Relais & Chateaux. Each of its 24 guestrooms, suites and private cottages were decorated by Joyce Conwy Evans, a London stage and set designer, in collaboration with Patrick O'Connell.

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