Kelly Wearstler inspired by pre-modernist European influences for San Francisco Proper Hotel

The property will be located within the city’s Flatiron Building, with Kelly Wearstler involved in the historic building’s redevelopment.

Proper Hospitality and the Kor Group are slated to open the San Francisco Proper Hotel later this summer. The property will be located within the city’s Flatiron Building, with Kelly Wearstler involved in the historic building’s redevelopment.

The historic building’s façade is being enhanced to reveal its Beaux Arts features.

The lobby, which is being refreshed by local artisans using centuries-old techniques, is being eyed to serve as a meeting space and as a commissary. It will have a residential look, outfitted with enclaves for socializing. Reminiscent of classic European salons, a lounge will be installed in the space, transitioning into the Cubism-inspired restaurant that Wearstler will don in various European modernist styles.

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The 131 guestrooms will also have residential qualities, merging Old World French and Italian characteristics.

Also upon completion, the San Francisco Proper Hotel will have a 3,400-square-foot rooftop terrace that will have a lounge and garden. It will be inspired by the living spaces of the Viennese Scession movement.

For events, the property will have a 14-seat boardroom and the neighboring meeting room, which will be able to accommodate up to 75 people.

 

 

 

 

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