How to design for guest interaction

The arrangement of seating in a space is often more important than the pieces chosen. Mark Goetz, designer for Cabot Wrenn, says that hotels traditionally looked for consistency in their arrangements from one property to the next, but now recognize that, based on the shape of a room, a space can be arranged to invite informal gatherings.

According to Goetz, with some arranging, a space can cater to impromptu business meetings, where guests can take advantage of circumstance within a location for two to five people to converge on a smaller scale. He said the greatest factor in arranging seating is accounting for people’s eyes and the directions people face to speak with one another.

According to Vlad Spivak, co-founder and CEO of Modern Line Furniture, armless chairs with straight backs are good for use in areas attempting to create a conversation space.

Virtual Roundtable

Post COVID-19: The New Guest Experience

Join Hotel Management’s Elaine Simon for our latest roundtable—Post COVID-19: The New Guest Experience. The experts on the panel will share how to inspire guest confidence that hotels are safe and clean and how to win back guest business.

Additionally, softer cushioned seating options are more likely to draw guests to an area, said Terrance Hunt, a designer for seating design firm Councill Contract.

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