Chicago hotel to feature three-level rooftop bar

LondonHouse Chicago
LondonHouse in Chicago will feature a three-level rooftop bar when it opens this spring.

What's being billed as Chicago’s only "tri-level" rooftop bar will open this spring at the future LondonHouse hotel — allowing people to drink atop one of the city’s most distinctive downtown buildings. 

A rendering of the swanky outdoor bar crowning the riverfront hotel is posted to the website of the LondonHouse, a 452-room conversion of a landmarked Beaux Arts tower at Michigan Avenue and Wacker Drive.

The rooftop will also offer "private drinks and dinner" in the distinctive cupola atop the 23-story tower, according to the LondonHouse website.

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LondonHouse takes its name from the first owner of the 1923 tower: the London Guaranty & Accident Co., an insurance company, as well as the London House jazz club that once occupied the building's ground floor.

Crain Communications and other office tenants filled the building until developer Oxford Capital Group acquired it in 2013. 

Once open, the hotel will also include a 2nd-floor lobby bar called "Bridges" and a street-level retail tenant that has yet to be announced. In December, LondonHouse announced that former Godfrey Hotel chef Riley Huddleston would handle food and drinks at the new hotel. A spokeswoman for the hotel project declined to provide more details when asked Thursday. 

The new hotel will also include a new, 22-story glass tower next door at 85 E. Wacker Drive. 

Source: DNAinfo.com

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