Airbnb to begin collecting San Fran hotel tax

Starting October 1, Airbnb will collect San Francisco’s 14-percent hotel tax from visitors who book apartments or rooms in the city—a move that could add more than $11 million a year to city coffers, reports SF Gate.

However, Airbnb, valued at a reported 10 billion, has not address whether it will pay back taxes for the six years it has been in business.

“Our community members in San Francisco have told us they want to pay their fair share and the overwhelming majority have asked us to help,” David Owen, Airbnb head of public policy, wrote in a blog post. “In the past, it’s been difficult for individual hosts to pay taxes that were designed for traditional hotels that operate year round.”

Virtual Event

HOTEL OPTIMIZATION PART 2 | SEPTEMBER 10 & 24, 2020

Survival in these times is highly dependent on a hotel's ability to quickly adapt and pivot their business to meet the current needs of travelers and the surrounding community. Join us for Optimization Part 2 – a FREE virtual event – as we bring together top players in the industry to discuss alternative uses when occupancy is down, ways to boost F&B revenue, how to help your staff adjust to new challenges and more, in a series of panels focused on how you can regain profitability during this crisis.


Like hotels, Airbnb will add the “transient occupancy tax” as a new line item for visitors, just as hotels do. For instance, an apartment that goes for $200 per night will now cost $228 with the 14-percent tax tacked on.

The move comes as San Francisco wrestles with proposed legislation by Supervisor David Chiu to legalize and regulate Airbnb.

Read more on

Suggested Articles

Safety measures can limit liability exposure, and new laws could have potential implications on COVID-19-related claims.

Hoteliers can learn valuable lessons from three different legal cases of fraud, due diligence and employee responsibility.

In a voice vote, the U.S. Senate cleared the way for further aid to businesses affected by the COVID-19 outbreak.