Debris can make an awful mess

Due to this year’s long and eventful winter, hotels may be inundated with snow around the bottom floor of their buildings, which could potentially hurt PTACs.

“With a lot of snow drift going on in the northern United States this winter, debris, gravel and rocks can get into PTACs that are even a foot off the ground of the first floor of hotels,” said Barry Bookout, national sales manager, lodging & specialty markets for Friedrich Air Conditioning.

Winter snowfall can be a magnet for debris capable of damaging a PTAC. Sometimes, even the snow by itself is enough to damage the room through the PTAC.

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According to Douglas Mackemer, national director, parts, supplies and special equipment for Carrier Enterprise, hotels should be sure there is not an abundance of snow located close to the building that could impede airflow and cause other operational issues.

“Occasionally you can get a buildup of snow that, when it melts, can make its way into the drain area of a PTAC,” Mackemer said. “If the PTAC sleeve was not caulked well during installation, water can even find its way into the drywall behind the unit, creating mold.” 

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