Rosewood Hotels & Resorts opens second destination in Thailand

New York-based Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF) has completed the new Rosewood Bangkok, just weeks after opening the brand's Hong Kong hotel.

The hotel’s design was inspired by the hand movement of the wai, the Thai gesture of greeting and welcome.

Designed with a direct link to public transportation, the Rosewood Hotel connects to the adjacent Ploenchit Skytrain Station and is part of the luxury enclave encompassing several embassies, new residential towers, offices, and high-end retail. Tandem Architects served as the executive architect, with Celia Chu Design Associates responsible for the interior design.

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Geometrical in shape, the property is not only culturally representative, but the sloping of the building also creates terraces, diminishing floorplates, and distinctive occupiable spaces as the tower rises. Two connected high-rise structures meet to create a central atrium with vertical gardens and an indoor waterfall.

In addition to the structure’s glossy façade and architecture, water features within the hotel – including the 10-story indoor waterfall—pay tribute to Bangkok, a city built on water. The element of water—sacred in Thai culture, featuring in rites and rituals to symbolize peace and harmony—is a pervasive theme throughout the hotel.

In a nod to the Rosewood brand’s origins as an aristocratic manor, the hotel’s entryway has modern metalwork sculpture in the form of wai spelled in ancient Thai alphabet by artist Jiandyin.

Inside, the design team used a neutral color palette. Throughout the hotel, terraces, abundant natural light and city skyline vistas meld with Thai artworks; local craft and indigenous textiles. 

The works of Thai artists featured in the property include pieces by Preecha Thaothong, named Thailand's National Artist for 2009; Pinaree Sanpitak; and Torlarp Larpjaroensook. The hotel’s “Art Connection” quarterly rotating exhibit features the multi-media works of emerging Thai artists, launching with oil paintings by Kittaya Poolsawatdi. 

In total, there are 159 rooms, including 34 suites and studios, as well as three “houses” with their own private pools and terraces.

Deluxe Rooms, starting at 42 square meters (452 square feet), were designed to include a separate living area, creating a more residential experience. The property’s suite collection includes the loft-style Manor Suite, which has floor-to-ceiling and wall-to-wall windows offering an abundance of natural light and views of the Bangkok skyline.

All guest accommodations have books, art, accessories and personal touches seemingly collected by the family over the course of their travels, giving these a residential feel. The rooms use a color palette including blue and green against a backdrop of white, cream, brown and gold color tones. There are also tropical accents of woods and rattan-inspired patterns, weaves and panels.

The design and architecture of Rosewood Bangkok allowed the creation of unique rooms and suites throughout the entire property, with no two floors sharing the same configuration. Allowing for maximum flexibility, privacy and intimacy, floorplates range from one to a maximum of 12 rooms per floor.

The 30-floor tower has four restaurant, as well as bars.

Lakorn European Brasserie is an all-day dining venue.

Nan Bei, meaning South and North respectively in Mandarin, is Rosewood Bangkok’s restaurant with indoor and outdoor seating, as well as open kitchens.

The Weaver Girl and Cowherd has a custom-woven art feature that stretches the length of the ceiling, in homage to the Weaver Girl who weaves clouds for the sky.  A light installation of 600 illuminated birds in flight references characters in the tale. Two VIP private dining rooms complement the story with silk wall panels and mirrors referencing the pond where the Weaver Girl and Cowherd first meet and fall in love. 

Nan Bei’s bar uses dark colors with pops of jewel tones, a lapis lazuli-topped bar, metalwork chandeliers and contemporized Art Deco features. 

Lennon’s is a speakeasy-style bar on the 30th and highest floor of Rosewood Bangkok. It is home to the largest collection of vinyl records in Asia (6,000-vinyl collection of jazz, pop, rock and blues), with a concept inspired by the notion of a home-recording studio. 

 Meanwhile, G&O (“green and organic”) is Bangkok’s first upscale organic café set within a luxury hotel.  Fittingly located just steps away from the outdoor pool, G&O brings the farm-to-table concept to life by offering a variety of creative healthy cuisine options with an emphasis on organic and locally grown and sourced natural ingredients, accompanied by hand and cold-pressed coffees and teas and organic wines. 

Sense, A Rosewood Spa occupies the entire sixth floor. 

Rosewood Bangkok also has an indoor-outdoor saltwater lap pool, a vertical garden wall and a whirlpool that overlooks the cityscape beyond.

For events, Rosewood Bangkok has the Pavilion, a 320 square meter (3,445 square foot) residential-style venue with show kitchen that can seat up to 200 persons. The 100 square meter (1,076 square foot) Ploenchit Boardroom is tailor-made for intimate meetings; flooded with natural light, it has views of the capital’s iconic skyline from its 28th-floor vantage point.

As the 27th property in the network for Rosewood Hotels & Resorts, the hotel is the brand’s second destination in Thailand.

Photo credit: Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates (KPF)

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