The evolving hotel breakfast

This is part two of Hotel Management's three part series on hotel F&B trends. Click here for part two: Grab-and-go food for on-the-go guests.

Fresh and local are the operative words when it comes to preparing breakfast for guests, and hotels have cracked down on ways to deliver the goods to their guests. Puerto Rico’s Wyndham Grand Rio Mar has its own pastry kitchen, which concocts all the property’s breakfast pastries on-
site. 

While most hotels don’t have access to such facilities, Danny Williams, GM of the hotel, has some tips on keeping things fresh. Williams suggests changing out items daily to create variety, and if that is not possible, find a way to differentiate one day from another even if that simply means preparing the eggs a different way. “A breakfast buffet is a hotel standard,” Williams said. “It’s something [hotels] should spend time and effort on to make it appealing.”

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“Every 18 months, Hampton adds something to the breakfast,” said Craig Marshall, GM of the Hampton Inn & Suites Memphis Beale Street. Marshall cites the recent addition of topping options on oatmeal, as well as new fruit options as the latest additions to the Hampton menu.

A big ticket for today’s travelers is locally sourced food, and the idea is as obvious as it is effective. According to Jeff Johnson, director of F&B for the Hyatt Regency Minneapolis, Minn., citizens of Minneapolis identify heavily with local companies and are often drawn to companies that support them."

We use local cheese, dairy and more, and Minneapolis citizens see local companies being supported by Hyatt and it matters,” Johnson said. “Local sourcing is very important to our clientele.”

 

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