Kempinski to open three new India hotels by 2020

Kempinski Hotels is stepping up its hotel pipeline in India, announcing plans to open three new hotels in the region by 2020.

According to the Economic Times, the new hotels are planned to be located in Kolkata, Mumbai and Kerala. Kempinski will operate all three of the properties, and the openings will bring Kempinski's total operation in India to four properties. Additionally, the property in Kerala is planned to be a resort.

Duncan O’Rourke, COO for Kempinski, told the Hindu Business line that the brand is still in talks for the final locations of the properties. “We plan to expand in India and believe that the country’s fundamentals offer strong growth opportunity," O'Rourke said. "India, historically, has not had an influx of high-end international chains but they are starting to come. India is an extremely important market, it is a tremendous growing economy.”

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Kempinski will follow a 'management contract model' for the new properties, according to the Deccan Chronicle. Currently, Kempinski has over 70 hotels globally and plans to open 112 hotels by 2017, all within the luxury segment. In the past, Kempinski partnered with Leela Hotels in India, but both companies recently parted ways. 

The company's first India hotel, the Kempinski Ambience Hotel, opened in Delhi in 2012.

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