Meyda Custom Lighting illuminates Upstate New York’s Tailwater Lodge

Meyda Custom Lighting illuminates Tailwater Lodge, a member of the Tapestry Collection by Hilton in Upstate New York.
All of the fixtures were handcrafted by artisans in Meyda’s 180,000 square foot manufacturing facility in Yorkville, New York. Photo credit: Meyda Custom Lighting

Tailwater Lodge Tapestry Collection by Hilton worked with Meyda Custom Lighting to create rustic fixtures in the property located in the town of Altmar in Upstate New York.

According to Charity Swanson Buchika, ASID, of Teaselwood Design and an interior designer for the Woodbine Group, which owns the Tailwater Lodge, the design team sought a “wow piece” that was large in scale but not too rustic for the bar and restaurant. The lounge now has several 54-inch wide, six-light chandeliers and a 42-inch long oblong pendant that are said to add drama to the rooms.

The Barn at Tailwater Lodge, which provides space for events, has a ceiling of rough-hewn beams and an adaptable space. This was illuminated with 84-inch 8 Light chandeliers and curved arm wall sconces that feature a Tall Pines design.

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In the portico, complementary 18-inch wide exterior pendants are displayed from the ceiling to add welcoming ambience as guests drive up to check in.

All of the fixtures were handcrafted by artisans in Meyda’s 180,000 square foot manufacturing facility in Yorkville, New York, at the foothills of the Adirondack Mountains.

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