Stantec to convert former INS Building in Miami to HGI

Hilton Garden Inn
The hotel will be part of the mixed-use development project Triton Center

The former US Immigration Naturalization Service (INS) 12-story building in Miami will be redesigned by the architecture and design firm Stantec and converted to a 139-key Hilton Garden Inn.

The hotel will be part of the mixed-use development project Triton Center that will also include three residential buildings, with a combined total of 325 apartments. It will be located at 7880 Biscayne Blvd.

Owned by real estate developer Florida Fullview Immigration Building, the 722,000 square foot development will also have 17,000 square feet of ground-level retail and 585 indoor parking spaces. A 20-foot pedestrian passage within a city plaza-like environment between the residential buildings and hotel complexes will be added. Each building will have its own pool and fitness center. Trees will surround the street level retail and food outlets.

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Stantec will integrate white stucco and metal panels highlighted with bright Miami accent colors and glass curtain walls. The project is expected to achieve LEED Silver certification.

Originally built in the 1960s as the Gulf American, the building was recognized as a mid-century modern tower with anodized aluminum sunscreens and transparent glass curtain walls spilling out to the street at its base. INS moved into the building in 1983 and vacated in 2008.

Hilton Garden Inn in Miami

Hilton Garden Inn in Miami

Hilton Garden Inn in Miami

Hilton Garden Inn in Miami

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Inspired by the history of the property, the overall design maintains the originality of the existing building while adding new amenities. 

The refurbishment focused on guestrooms and hallways along with exterior painting and lighting upgrades.

As of the end of June, the total U.S. hotel construction pipeline is down just 1 percent from last year, according to Lodging Econometrics.