How Warwick Denver's Playboy connection inspired the property's renovation

The Warwick Denver has completed the renovation of all its 216 guestrooms and suites.

The hotel was originally built as the Governor’s Court and used to be the first and only Playboy Club in Colorado. In a nod to its history, the interior design was inspired by the Playboy connection with references found through guestroom artwork.

Every room was reconfigured and now has Wi-Fi connection and multiple power points for charging electronic devices. Averaging more than 425 square feet, the rooms use natural textures, and reflect the rustic characteristics of the Rocky Mountains and the state of Colorado. In addition, each room or suite has an outdoor balcony (measuring 120 square feet), overlooking the downtown skyline or the Denver cityscape.

FREE HOTEL MANAGEMENT NEWSLETTER

Like this story? Subscribe to Hotel Design!

Hospitality professionals turn to Hotel Design as their go-to news source for the latest products, projects, and trends for hotel interior designers and architects. Sign up today to get news and updates delivered to your inbox and read on the go.

Located between the Capitol Hill and the Downtown Commercial District, the Warwick Denver has a rooftop outdoor heated swimming pool and sun deck rooftop bar with views of the city and the mountains.

Located on the 15th floor is the fitness center. On the other side of the 15th floor is the Millennium Ballroom, which has three-sided city views. This event space is in addition to 4,500 square feet of meeting and function space featuring floor to ceiling windows.

For dining, the property has Randolph’s, which is adjacent to a garden terrace.

Suggested Articles

The hotels, all owned by U.S. OCG, total 499 rooms and together offer more than 93,000 square feet of meeting space.

The micro-hotel brand has confirmed six additional properties in New York City, Indianapolis, Savannah, Washington, D.C. and Lima, Peru.

The Middle East total was a 5.7 percent drop in the number of rooms under construction, while Africa's construction total is down 4 percent.