Overcoming buyer objections a key to closing sales

Howard Feiertag

Howard FeiertagPictured: Howard Feiertag

Without resistance to buying there would be no need for sales people. Resistance is the most important hurdle every sales person has to get over. The whole idea is to know what’s keeping a prospect from buying. Once the real reason is known, perhaps then a sales person can figure how to get around that particular issue.

We need to take a look at the various reasons why people might have an objection to making a buy decision.

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Some of these reasons to resist buying might include: a lack of knowledge (the person needs to know more about value/benefits); skepticism (unease about being unfamiliar with the hotel brand or location); a need to compare offers (what are competing hotels offering?); trading advantage (price, trying to get something extra); prejudice (personal, company) or a perceived bad reputation of property (“so and so said this about your hotel.").

A sales person needs to figure out what prospects really mean when they object. Perhaps it is just: “I do not want it so I’ll complain about [insert complaint here]”; or “I don’t like this sales person”; or “Maybe price is more than budget.”

Once the sales person gets a pretty good idea of what the issue might be, it is time to come up with the process of attempting to overcome the objection.

The first rule in this business is never start defending or explaining your position once someone rejects an opportunity. If someone indicates that “the price is too high,” as an example, we do not want to defend the position and explain why that rate is quoted. What you have to do is try to find out if that is a real reason, or maybe it is something else.

To do this, questions need to be asked of the prospect. Every time an objection comes up, a sales person needs to ask questions to try to analyze the objection. Use a series of “why” questions to help define what the prospect really means.

For a free copy of my tip sheet on “Overcoming Objections,” send an email request to: [email protected]

Sometimes we have to admit the obvious. Suppose a prospect says: “Well, you are 40 miles from the airport.” Since you already know that, you cannot follow up by asking, “Why do you say that?” In a situation like this it may be that the sales person needs to point out additional benefits that might make up for that issue.

It is better to anticipate objections so they may be handled during the presentation.

Managers and sales staff should make a list of the most typical objections they have experienced.

Following this, practice sessions should be planned that cover how to prove benefits during a presentation. Set up strategies to overcome those objections. Remember to ask questions to analyze the objections; answers help define the problem.

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