Why politics, this election are damaging to the hotel industry

Politics stink.

I didn’t always feel that way. There was a time when I loved nothing more than getting up early on a Sunday and feasting on political programming. But these days I’m simply over it. Like the late, great John McLaughlin said, “Bye, Bye!”

Hatemongering, political rancor and fear stoking have conspired to sicken me. And I am not a fan of being sick. (Well, except for that one time I got sick from White Castle—that was a glorious evening.)

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But while I will still go to White Castle, I’m doing all I can to shut out the political din. It’s spirit crushing, and makes me more depressed than the shocking reality that two of the Spice Girls will not be joining the 20th Anniversary reunion tour. Please don’t try to sneakily replace them, like they did with Jan in all those "Brady Bunch" sequel programs.

I cannot wait until Nov. 9, when I’m hoping to have some sort of reprieve, because I'm exhausted from the unavoidable spray of media madness. I try to shower and get it off me, but no. I am unclean. And I cry.

I keep waiting for P.T. Barnum to appear to remind us we’re all suckers.

The major news networks are gorging themselves like a sensationalist Augustus Gloop, filling themselves with as much political candy as they can muster. It’s all horrifically toxic, and it’s creating an ominous negative effect bubbling just below the surface of the hotel business.  

Politics Hurt YOU!

Clinton, Trump and the election circus are damaging the hotel industry. You may not see it because this truth is obfuscated by years of increasing revenues. But today’s horrible and shameful political climate is destroying rational decision making. It’s time to step back and separate yourself from potential political ramifications.

As an industry, we will stand stronger by avoiding shameful political nonsense and grandstanding and simply focusing on building well-run businesses that help real people’s lives—the lives politicians are all claiming they’ll put to work, but you already are.

Don’t Wait, Act!

I’m tired of going to industry events and hearing: “We can’t a make any decisions until the political climate becomes more certain.” It’s a misleading mantra taking us down the wrong path.

Guess what, here is the only thing certain and steady about politicians these days: They care about themselves and their careers, not you.

I’ve sat through many election cycles and have learned waiting on government for anything is a waste of time. They despise anyone who worships a different spirit animal than theirs, and that sort of stuff takes up a lot of time. Are you aware how time consuming not getting anything done actually is?

Don’t wait for the government to get their act in order. You’ll be waiting and waiting.

Just remember, if the ‘other’ candidate gets elected, the world will absolutely, unequivocally come to end. So, since we’re about to personally greet the Horseman of the Apocalypse anyways, why not just thrown caution out the window and make the decisions you know you need to make now.

Come next year when either he or she becomes President, you’ll already be glad you did.

So do I deserve a flailing for this point of view? Perhaps I nailed it? Drop me a line here at [email protected]. Or find me on Twitter @TravelingGlenn.

Glenn Haussman is editor-at-large for HOTEL MANAGEMENT. His views expressed are not necessarily those of HOTEL MANAGEMENT, its parent company Questex Media Group, and/or its subsidiaries.

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