American couple serves up boutique hotel in Tuscany

La Chiusa's features include a 900-tree olive grove and a Michelin-starred, garden-to-table restaurant. Photo credit: La Chiusa.

George and Linda Meyers, the Washington, D.C.-based couple who founded three cooking schools (Cook In Tuscany, Cook In Mexico, and Cook In Cuba) have purchased a boutique hotel in Tuscany.

La Chiusa is an 18-room boutique hotel, adapted from a former olive mill in Montefollonico, a preserved medieval village surrounded by 13th-century walls that protect Montefollonico Castle. 

The hotel's features include a 900-tree olive grove and a Michelin-starred, garden-to-table restaurant that serves breakfast, lunch and dinner. 

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La Chiusa also will be home base for the Meyers' week-long cooking school program, Cook In Tuscany. Participants in this program can stay at the hotel and cook in the kitchen.

The property is within an hour’s drive of several tourism destinations, including Montefollonico, Montepulciano (famous for its vineyards), Montalcino, Cortona, Pienza, Siena, Perugia and San Quirico. 

Beyond the culinary focus, the hotel also has meeting facilities for up to 30 persons.

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