Meininger opens first Hungarian hotel

The new-build Meininger Budapest Great Market Hall, which is located about a kilometer south of the city center, has 184 guestrooms. Photo credit: Meininger Hotels

With the opening of the Meininger Budapest Great Market Hall, U.K.-based Meininger Hotels has expanded into the Hungarian market. The new-build property, about a kilometer south of the city center, has 184 guestrooms and is the first of two new entries planned for Europe in 2019. This summer, the hotel group will open its first hotel in France. 

The interior design is inspired by Hungarian craftsmanship and the neo-Gothic architectural style of the neighboring Great Market Hall (Nagy Vásárcsarnok). 

“2018 was a record year for the tourism in Hungary,” Hannes Spanring, CEO of Meininger Hotels, said in a statement. “In total, about 31 million overnight stays were recorded. The number of foreign overnight guests rose by 650,000 compared to 2017. Especially the capital city benefits from this increasing demand, which attracts visitors from all over the world with its unique flair and UNESCO sights.”  

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The new accommodation next to the Great Market Hall welcomes individual, group and business travelers. “Our house is characterized by a particularly flexible room structure. It allows us to respond to a diverse guest mix as well as the varying needs of our guests," said Doros Theodorou, CCO of Meininger Hotels. "They can choose between single and double rooms as well as private dorm rooms and also dormitories. The public areas provide plenty of room for social interaction and reflect the character of the local environment."