Barceló expands in Morocco

The Barceló Palmeraie resort's architecture was inspired by ancient Moroccan palaces. Photo credit: Barceló Hotel Group

Followng the addition last year in Morocco of three new hotels in Tangier, Agadir and Casablanca, the Barceló Hotel Group has purchased the Barceló Palmeraie for €35 million, as well as land for a future property. 

The 252-room resort is located just north of Marrakech, adjacent to a 17-acre grove of olive and palm trees. The hotel group also bought two parcels of land: one next to the resort for 120 additional rooms and the other three kilometers from the city center, where the Barceló Hotel Group plans to build a new hotel with 160 rooms.

The resort's architecture was inspired by ancient Moroccan palaces. The grounds include 140,000 square meters of gardens and two outdoor pools. F&B options include a wine cellar, a tea room and two restaurants, one of which emphasizes Moroccan cuisine. The wellness center covers more than 500 square meters and has four spa treatment rooms, a hammam and a gym. The resort’s 10 meeting rooms have space for up to 400 attendees.

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The hotel chain now has to six hotels and 1,136 rooms in Morocco. These include:  Barceló Casablanca (85 rooms), Barceló Fès Medina (134 rooms),  Barceló Tánger (138 rooms) Allegro Agadir (321 rooms) Barceló Anfa Casablanca (206 rooms) and the Barceló Palmeraie (252 rooms).

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