Hotel Equities opens Houston's newest Four Points by Sheraton hotel

The 123-key Four Points Houston IA features 2,500 square feet of meeting space.

Atlanta-based Hotel Equities opened the Four Points Houston Intercontinental Airport, the firm’s second Four Points in the Houston market. Hotel Equities serves as the management company for the hotel owned by Pari, LLC. Adam Stacey is the general manager and Luis Matus serves as the director of sales.

“We are excited to open our second Four Points hotel in the Greater Houston market and further expand our firm’s presence in Houston" Joe Reardon, SVP of business development and marketing for Hotel Equities, said in a statement.

Four Points Houston Intercontinental Airport is located 3 miles from George Bush Intercontinental Airport, and close to many shopping and dining options. Nearby are corporate offices of numerous aeronautics, biomedical and energy companies, including Exxon, Halliburton, GE Oil & Gas, and Schlumberger.

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The 123-key full-service Four Points Houston IA at 1450 N. Sam Houston Parkway East features 2,500 square feet of meeting space, a 24-hour fitness center, business center and fast and free Wi-Fi throughout the hotel. Guests will enjoy full-service dining at the hotel pub and the brand’s iconic Best Brews and BBQ, which serves guests refreshing, curated local beers and seasonal BBQ-style appetizers. Bombshell Blonde by Southern Star is Four Points Houston Intercontinental Airport’s Best Brew.

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