Flick Mars renovates The Highland Dallas

Flick Mars renovates The Highland Dallas
The project was inspired by the property’s location and its past as the original home of Dallas’ Hilton Inn.

The Highland Dallas was renovated, with the project inspired by the property’s location at the intersection of the Highland Park and Lakewood neighborhoods, as well as its past as the original home of Dallas’ Hilton Inn.

The redesign was helmed by Flick Mars.

The guestrooms now have carpets with neutrals that are said to represent the typography of oil and gas, two commodities in Dallas. These contrast with the bedside table and desk. There is also a leather-inspired custom headboard that evoke the feel of a distressed leather saddle.

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There is artwork located throughout the hotel. In the guestrooms, a piece of functional artwork is displayed on each window’s roller shade. The shade depicts a black and white image combining nature and The Highland’s southern roots.

The hotel’s 6,470-square-foot Opus Grand Ballroom was also reimagined with new design pieces, textures and patterns. A focal point of the redesign is a custom-designed carpet, which has a large pattern that is non-repetitive. On the walls, a collection of tailor-made, decorative sconces mimic jewelry. The enhanced ballroom can host up to 500 guests.

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