5 signs it’s time to switch internet providers

When it comes to internet, too many hotels have checked the box and moved on. From check-in to checkout and everything in between, many guest touchpoints rely on fast, secure Wi-Fi connectivity. And it could be hurting your business and reputation if you’re not paying close enough attention to it.

Here are 5 signs your property’s internet is dragging you down instead of helping you stand out, and it’s time to switch providers.

 

  1. Your online ratings and return customers are low.

    Wi-Fi is such an integral part of people’s daily lives that if your network frustrates guests, it will affect their overall impression of your property. If they can’t reliably stay connected throughout their stay or if they have a disappointing transaction or technology experience, they’ll let other people know about it—and they’ll look somewhere else next time they take a trip.

    Your internet vendor should be constantly monitoring your network, have redundancy and failover plans in place, and proactively taking care of any issues so your guests stay connected and stay happy.
     
  2. Connecting to your network isn’t a great experience.

    Is it clear to guests that they’re connecting to the right network? Does your captive portal page look professional, reflecting the same branding, look, and feel as your website and interactive TV? Is authentication simple, mobile-friendly, and fast? Is it set up to ensure a secure, reliable connection for the duration of your guest’s stay?

    If a guest waits longer than a few seconds to connect, is required to reauthenticate multiple times, or needs to call for help, your Wi-Fi is making a bad impression. A good internet provider will make sure your setup is offering the best experience for you and your guests.

     
  3. You don’t know when or how your network’s being used.

    It should be easy to see how much bandwidth your guests are using and when your network is being tapped the most. Having this information will help make sure your network is optimized and can handle the load it demands no matter when guests are connecting.

    If you don’t know how your network is being used because of antiquated technology or visibility, you’re more prone to security risks and threats.

    Tracking usage trends will also key you in to when it’s time to budget for equipment upgrades that will keep up with higher bandwidth demands, tighter security protocols, and more connected devices. The best internet partner will provide a site survey and recommendations for both short-term and long-term solutions—including cabling, access points, wired ports, circuits, and other hardware and software—to keep everyone and everything connected at your property.

     
  4. Your Wi-Fi isn’t generating revenue for you.

    Do you offer tiered bandwidth access? Are you upselling conference network services?  Does your marketing team have access to email addresses for guests and visitors? Your internet network has the potential to help you generate consistent revenue—while giving your guests as a seamless experience that’s better than your competitors.

    Ask your vendor what options they have available to make internet revenue possible for your property.

     
  5. You think good enough is good enough.

    Change is hard. But the cost of not changing can be worse. This is especially true in hospitality, where keeping up with guest expectations is paramount to staying ahead in the industry.

    Prioritizing what matters most to your guests makes it clear you understand their needs and are here to make every aspect of their stay great. Your technology vendors should be doing the same—for both your guests and your staff.

    They should be there for you from design to delivery, to ongoing monitoring and support. Everything should work right the first time, and every time. You should have peace of mind with the technology and the people behind it.

    Because your guests expect the best, you should have SONIFI in your corner when it comes to all things Wi-Fi and network connectivity.

The editorial staff had no role in this post's creation.