Aesthetic continuity: Invisible solar rooftile by Dyaqua

Dyaqua integrates photovoltaic and photocatalytic technology into an architectural element with the company’s Invisible solar rooftile.

Italian company Dyaqua is finding ways to make eco-friendly design elements stylish. The company is integrating photovoltaic and photocatalytic technology into an architectural element with the company’s Invisible solar rooftile, which features a natural look and realistic surface that blends into its environment.

Intended for new and existing roofs, the rooftiles look like traditional barrel tiles made from clay, so they blend in the aesthetic continuity of the roof. Made with non-toxic and recyclable materials, the rooftiles can withstand a heavy load and tolerate chemical solvents and atmospheric agents. Also, their photocatalytic properties mean that when activated by light, the tiles purify the air while cleaning the tile’s surface.

Virtual Roundtable

Post COVID-19: The New Guest Experience

Join Hotel Management’s Elaine Simon for our latest roundtable—Post COVID-19: The New Guest Experience. The experts on the panel will share how to inspire guest confidence that hotels are safe and clean and how to win back guest business.
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