Nature inspires Stonehill Taylor’s interior design for NYC's Park Terrace Hotel

Right alongside Bryant Park in New York City's midtown, the Park Terrace Hotel has opened with design from Stonehill & Taylor.

All Park Terrace Hotel rooms havedecor inspired by natural harmony. There are 226 guestrooms, many of which have direct views of Bryant Park and the New York Public Library. (Custom window treatments provide a complete blackout when needed.) 

The hotel has four meeting rooms. Stacks I & Stacks II, named for the neighboring New York Public Library, fit between 18 and 50 people. Ivy & Hyacinth, ideal for intimate gatherings, fit between four to six people and are located off Terrazzo Terrace & Lounge. All meeting rooms have LCD screens, polycoms and an LED projector along with the 1GB Wi-Fi.

Virtual Event

HOTEL OPTIMIZATION PART 2 | SEPTEMBER 10 & 24, 2020

Survival in these times is highly dependent on a hotel's ability to quickly adapt and pivot their business to meet the current needs of travelers and the surrounding community. Join us for Optimization Part 2 – a FREE virtual event – as we bring together top players in the industry to discuss alternative uses when occupancy is down, ways to boost F&B revenue, how to help your staff adjust to new challenges and more, in a series of panels focused on how you can regain profitability during this crisis.


For dining, the property has Terrazzo Lounge and Terrace, located on the hotel's sixth floor. Coming Summer 2019 will be La Pecora Bianca restaurant.

Other hotel amenities include hydration stations on every floor and a gym including a sauna.

Mark Briskin is the GM of the Park Terrace Hotel.

Photo credit: Mark Weinberg/Park Terrace Hotel

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