M3 unveils new mobile app to increase productivity


With the M3 app, hoteliers can quickly toggle between prior year or budget comparisons to view variances based on daily, month-to-date or year-to-date current year performance.

To allow busy hotel owners and managers easier access to property financial data, at home and on the road, M3 has recently introduced its mobile app for both iOS and Android devices.

The M3 mobile app enables hoteliers to securely access their data like never before, viewing real-time, mission-critical information like:

  • Key performance indexes: occupancy and ADR;
  • Rooms rented;
  • Total room revenue;
  • Food and bar revenue; 
  • Rooms out of order;
  • Redemptions;
  • Guaranteed no shows;
  • Complimentary rooms;

“I’m always on the road, and this app has given me access to the information that I need to make great business decisions about the hotels my company owns and manages,” M3 CEO John McKibbon said in a statement. “We’ve provided analytics tools to hoteliers for many years now, but having access to this information in the palm of my hand, wherever I’m at really brings the Operations Management platform data to a whole new level. My Regional Managers have embraced the mobile app and have already made it part of their daily routine.”

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With the M3 app, hoteliers can quickly toggle between previous year or budget comparisons to view variances based on daily, month-to-date or year-to-date current-year performance.

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